GSAC Analytics

Why does Georgia need a coalition government

Why does Georgia need a coalition government

Of course, from the point of view of the distribution of responsibility, the coalition government is more acceptable to society, since in 2012 all political parties in the coalition were responsible, including to international partners. As for the current state of affairs, it makes no sense to talk about the coalition in the abstract.

We can discuss the coalition around the Georgian Dream and try to simulate different configurations of how strong it will be and whether it will receive public support. Another option is when the coalition government is formed by the winning opposition.

However, there are too many questions and preconditions here. For example, to form a government, you must have at least 40%, in addition to this party. which will take the initiative to form a government must have a sufficient number of votes. It is clear that a party that will have 3% of voters’ support is unlikely to come up with an initiative to form a government. Therefore, everything depends on who will be the leading force in the ruling coalition and who are the partners.

The fact that the opposition does not even try to explain to society that we are in an absolutely new constitutional reality causes misunderstanding and pessimism among voters. Presidential rule, by default, assumes the presence of a specific leader and a political party oriented towards him. But we now have a parliamentary form of government, and when there are several political parties in the country with approximately the same rating and their leaders, they complement and replace each other in the political field. That is, today someone can be in opposition, and tomorrow they together can create a coalition and enter the government. That is, the problem is not that today the opposition does not have one clearly expressed leader, but that the opposition has a deficit of political forces of equal weight.

But in general, the same trouble in Georgia. as in the world. The political elite has become old and this is a very serious conclusion.

Khatuna Lagazidze, Georgian Strategic Analysis Center GSAC